IICSEEHawaii2017


Photographs of The IAFOR International Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment – Hawaii 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

Conference Theme: “East Meets West: Innovation and Discovery”

January 5–7, 2017 | The Hawai'i Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

From natural phenomena and the results of climate change, through pollution and societal traumas, migrations and war, the enormous challenges that face humankind and our environment are frequently daunting, and difficult to comprehend. However, with every new challenge or disruption comes the opportunity for innovation and discovery. Whether inventing new technologies, implementing innovative systems, enacting better policies, legislation, or governance, or ensuring greater cooperation and information sharing, responses are many and varied.

From incremental shift to radical change, from local to regional, or from the national to the global, this international conference will focus on the challenges that demand a collective response. It will highlight the need to harness our abilities as scientists, policymakers, practitioners, engineers and educators to find multidisciplinary solutions in pursuit of the common goal of a sustainable world.

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IICSEE2017 Conference Photographs

Human interaction is at the root of all knowledge creation, and hence the great importance of the conference in introducing, testing and spreading ideas through challenging, rigorous and thought provoking discussion and debate. But beyond that, a conference is also a great chance to meet people from around the world, and to extend and grow ones’s professional network, and above all, to make friends.

It may be impossible to tell the story of the conference, or rather the many hundreds of interlocking stories that go to make up the conference, but the documentary photography in this slideshow aims to give a taster of the more serious academic side of the event, as well as the lighter side…

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Programme

  • Liquid Archives
    Liquid Archives
    Keynote Presentation: Jaimey Hamilton Faris
  • Everyday Surveillance: A Case Study of Student Information Systems
    Everyday Surveillance: A Case Study of Student Information Systems
    Featured Presentation: William G. Staples
  • Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
    Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
    Featured Presentation: James W. McNally
  • Eco-Diplomacy – Water Conservation/Protection at US Embassies Demonstrating Best Practices for a Sustainable Built Environment
    Eco-Diplomacy – Water Conservation/Protection at US Embassies Demonstrating Best Practices for a Sustainable Built Environment
    Featured Presentation: Donna McIntire-Byrd
  • Statistics in the Cognitive/Risk Era: Bridging Knowledge, Solutions and Pathways to a Sustainable World
    Statistics in the Cognitive/Risk Era: Bridging Knowledge, Solutions and Pathways to a Sustainable World
    Featured Presentation: Nathaniel Newlands
  • “It is Happening Again”: Re-imagining in Mark Frost’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks
    “It is Happening Again”: Re-imagining in Mark Frost’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks
    Spotlight Presentation: Richard Donovan
  • Pushing European Boundaries Towards East and West: Gulliver in Japan and America
    Pushing European Boundaries Towards East and West: Gulliver in Japan and America
    Partner Presentation: Ljiljana Markovic & Biljana Djoric Francuski

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Speakers

  • Xu Di
    Xu Di
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Richard Donovan
    Richard Donovan
    Kansai University, Japan
  • Jaimey Hamilton Faris
    Jaimey Hamilton Faris
    University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA
  • Donna McIntire-Byrd
    Donna McIntire-Byrd
    United States Department of State, USA
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Nathaniel Newlands
    Nathaniel Newlands
    Distinguished Researcher and Innovator from Canada
  • William G. Staples
    William G. Staples
    University of Kansas, USA

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The IAFOR International Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment – Hawaii (IICSEEHawaii) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and oversee the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Steve Cornwell
    Steve Cornwell
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Joseph Haldane
    Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Curtis Ho
    Curtis Ho
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Sue Jackson
    Sue Jackson
    Birkbeck, University of London, UK
  • Barbara Lockee
    Barbara Lockee
    Virginia Tech, USA
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Ted O’Neill
    Ted O’Neill
    Gakushuin University, Japan

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Liquid Archives
Keynote Presentation: Jaimey Hamilton Faris

Even as big data can be used to visualize our moment-by-moment shipping activities, it is difficult to capture how these activities affect sea levels and ice caps in a single image. How to come to terms with this contradiction? Perhaps one way is to be more attentive to oil and water as quickly accumulating repositories that challenge our very systems of conceptualization, innovation, and analysis. If we follow this path, we will need to think of them as archives, as media, as heterogeneous witnesses of the past, present and future – and not merely as assets and resources to be used in the now. This talk will introduce this notion of “liquid archives” and a selection of artists (often in conjunction with writers, scientists, geographers and others) who have established new visual and interpretive strategies to make this archive known and felt. They attempt to make visible the important geological, cultural and historical markers hidden in our oceans, atmospheres, icecaps, aquifers and oil veins. They also seek ways to visualize the information flowing through government agencies, global business and bundles of fiber-optic cable on the bottom of the sea-floor as accumulating markers of the recent history of techno-capitalism. These various efforts to establish the liquid archives all necessitate radical adjustments in our perception of the moment when global flows meet climate change.

Read presenter biographies.

Everyday Surveillance: A Case Study of Student Information Systems
Featured Presentation: William G. Staples

In my book, Everyday Surveillance: Vigilance and Visibility in Postmodern Life (2014), I focus attention on the relatively mundane techniques of keeping a close watch on people – what I have dubbed the “Tiny Brothers” – that are increasingly present in the workplace, the school, the home and the community. I show how our bodies, behaviors and movements are being tracked by a host of public and private organizations – sometimes with our consent, sometimes without – through Internet use, cell phones, video cameras, credit cards, license plate readers, loyalty shopping cards, and more. One example of this phenomenon I highlight is internet-based student information systems (SIS) that offer students, parents, teachers and administrators immediate access to differentially detailed student profiles. Students can check their grades while parents can see if their child is in class, access assignments, and view a teacher’s grade book in “real-time”, while administrators can review student demographic data, behavior and disciplinary files, health records and family information, teachers’ comments to students and parents, and more. I will report on in-depth interviews with a sample of students, parents, teachers, and school administrators to derive accounts of how the SIS actually operates and how these participants experience life with an SIS. Interviewees report that the SIS increases communication among school stakeholders, while their responses suggest that in doing so the systems intensify the performance and behavior monitoring of students and encourages micro-level assessments of their everyday lives.

Read presenter biographies.

Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Featured Presentation: James W. McNally

Recent health emergencies such as the ebola outbreak in 2015 and the current zika virus reflects the pressing need for the rapid and statistically meaningful collection of data, often within small geographic areas. The collection of public health data at the community level is challenging for a number of reasons. Building respondent trust and gaining local support are key, but even when these barriers are overcome the choice of questions and how they are asked is central to the success of a study and to its impact on health improvements and policy change. One of the common problems found in many community level studies is the lack of comparability and the inability to generalize findings beyond the study area. While interesting and useful information is often obtained, translating this information into a framework that facilitates policy impact often proves difficult due to a lack of comparability. The NACDA Program on Aging has been promoting a methodology for overcoming the challenges of generalizability and comparability that has been successfully employed in several small area studies of public health and healthcare unitization. The presentation will describe this methodology and provide examples of its efficacy in real-world research situations. The presentation will provide supporting materials to guide interested users in applying this approach for their own research specializations. This approach is flexible and works across languages and research disciplines so it can be applied in a variety of public health studies, including RAPID AREA ANALYSIS (RAP) situations.

Read presenter biographies.

Eco-Diplomacy – Water Conservation/Protection at US Embassies Demonstrating Best Practices for a Sustainable Built Environment
Featured Presentation: Donna McIntire-Byrd

As segments of the world’s populations are increasingly impacted by water scarcity, the State Department is committed to conserving water resources and providing leadership in water resource protection at our embassies overseas. By reducing water demands on public systems and local groundwater, increasing water reuse on-site, and protecting water quality at our diplomatic and residential facilities, the United States sets an example and demonstrates best water practices that impact our host nations. Aligned with federal mandates, the Department aims to reduce potable water use in buildings and outdoors. To support this challenge, we routinely incorporate water-saving technologies and strategies into capital construction projects and major renovations. To optimize water use at existing facilities, we conduct comprehensive water audits at posts with high water use or at posts experiencing water shortages, and are planning new projects to reuse rainwater and treated wastewater effluent for landscape irrigation and for use within building systems. Three embassy case studies will be presented in this workshop: London, United Kingdom; Monrovia, Liberia; and Nairobi, Kenya. Through these case studies, participants will learn about best practices for water conservation and alternative water sources, such as rainwater and treated wastewater. After instructions on how to work toward a net-zero water solution, participants will use tools developed to enable architects and engineers to identify and evaluate water resources and balance them with development demands, working in teams to develop and present their solution to the group.

Read presenter biographies.

Statistics in the Cognitive/Risk Era: Bridging Knowledge, Solutions and Pathways to a Sustainable World
Featured Presentation: Nathaniel Newlands

Humans interact with real and virtual ecosystems. Virtual (model and collaborative) ecosystems continue to expand in their knowledge, sophistication and influence in addressing increasingly complex situations and challenges involving real systems. Our world, however, continues to struggle with escalating inequality and insecurity, economic volatility, environmental resource scarcity and pollution, population growth, rapid urbanization, extreme weather, invasive species and political upheaval. Despite increasing global awareness of the urgency to address climate change and become more sustainable, societies continue to struggle in how best to transition to a low-carbon economy and take broader action aligned with sustainable development pathways. This is due to a complex array of trade-offs, varying uncertainties, changing inter-dependencies and unforeseen risks. Much of our knowledge is also domain-specific, relying strongly on historical observations of patterns and processes. To bridge this ‘knowledge-to-action’ divide, statistics has an increasingly critical role in unraveling the complexity of our world and how we construct reliable/flexible real-world solutions from interdisciplinary knowledge.

The talk will broadly cover the concept of ‘integrated risk’ and how it may transform our current sustainable development dialogue, enabling more informed action/s. Our collective ability to sustain ecosystems and our societies in the future, over the long-term, will involve a stronger symbiosis of human and machine intelligence (‘super-intelligent tools’ that support complex decision-making). Such tools are capable of transforming our current understanding and future capability to respond to anticipated/emergent extreme conditions and tipping-points (dynamical changes of a system’s state), in a coherent and informed way. Perspectives and recommendations on the broad application of statistics in addressing sustainable development challenges, drawing on my research within the food-water-energy nexus and agricultural sector (i.e., modeling of greenhouse-gas emissions, climate interpolation, operational forecasting, sensor-based monitoring networks, sustainability assessment), will be discussed.

Read presenter biographies.

“It is Happening Again”: Re-imagining in Mark Frost’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks
Spotlight Presentation: Richard Donovan

In the early 1990s, David Lynch, film director, and Mark Frost, creator of The X-Files, collaborated on the groundbreaking television series Twin Peaks. Though it only ran for two seasons and a feature film, Twin Peaks has become a cult classic, even credited with ushering in the “golden age” of multilayered, longform audiovisual narrative that currently plays out in many drama series on the small screen. Its fanbase is responsible for the upcoming 2017 revival of the TV series, but in the interim, Mark Frost has written a book entitled The Secret History of Twin Peaks, both to (re)contextualise the series’ prior manifestations and to prepare for its return. This paper explores the almost unprecedented intertextuality and intermediality of Frost’s printed text and the corresponding audiobook version, delineating the space that these works occupy in the Twin Peaks universe and their possible implications both for the upcoming TV series and for the boundaries of narrative fiction itself.

Read presenter biographies.

Pushing European Boundaries Towards East and West: Gulliver in Japan and America
Partner Presentation: Ljiljana Markovic & Biljana Djoric Francuski

Worldwide, in the East as well as in the West, one character has become a part of everybody’s childhood, regardless of ethnicity, national or cultural belongings, age and status. The fame of Lemuel Gulliver has survived from the early eighteenth century until today, outlasting many other fictitious protagonists in world literature, making Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels a real classic. At the mention of Gulliver’s name, it is immediately and inseparably associated in everyone’s mind with his travels to Lilliput, an imaginary land. However, two out of four of his journeys are destined for landscapes that are not at all imagined or imaginary. This is a lesser-known fact, just like certain details concerning the life of Gulliver’s creator, Swift, above all that he was born in Dublin, though of English origin, and was even ordained in the Church of Ireland. This factor is very significant, since being the Other in his own life certainly helped Swift supply such extreme examples of the Other in his magnificent work. The meaning of otherness in Gulliver’s Travels does not refer only to the size of the people he encounters, but also to the fact that they belong to other races and ethnicities. It is the purpose of this paper to shed light on otherness in environments at the opposite ends of the world from Europe – Japan in the farthest East and America in the farthest West – in order to prove that this absolute openness to the Other has greatly contributed to Swift’s supreme value that persists to this very day.

Read presenter biographies.

Xu Di
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Xu Di (许笛) is a professor in the department of Education Foundations, College of Education, University of Hawai’i-Mānoa. She is a member of the board of examiners for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, now Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation [CAEP]), which has provided national accreditation for teacher education programs in the United States since 2007. Her recent publications focus on bridging Eastern and Western philosophy for educational practices and include Chinese Philosophy on Teaching & Learning: Xueji《学记》 in the Twenty-First Century (2016), The Wisdom from the East: A Holistic Theory and Practice of Health and Wellness (2013), Spiritual Heritage and Education Today (2013), Taoism: Origin, Essence, and Practice (2013), and A Reading of Lao Zi for Educational Philosophers Today (2012). In addition, she published A Comparison of the Educational Ideas and Practices of John Dewey and Mao Zedong in China (1992) and various chapters and articles on teacher education, educational foundations, multicultural education, international education, and ESL education. She worked as an international consultant in teacher education and educational reforms in Central Asia and Africa for the World Bank in 2002 and 2001. She served on the Hawai’i Teacher Standard Board (2005–2008) and as the president of the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) Hawai’i Chapter as well as Hawai’i state representative (2006–2008). She was a visiting scholar and research associate at the Philosophy of Educational Research Center at Harvard University (1999–2000), a visiting professor in Peking University (2015, 2011, 2009, and 1997) and in Renmin University (2012, 2014, and 2016), and an exchange professor at National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan (1998). She served as manuscript editor as well as editorial board member for Harvard Educational Review during 1988–1990. She was honored in Who’s Who among American Teachers in 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2008.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Educational Policy: Does the Democratisation of Education in Educational Systems Fuel Economic and Social Inequality?
Richard Donovan
Kansai University, Japan

Biography

Richard Donovan lectures in comparative literature and translation studies in the Faculty of Letters at Kansai University. He has also worked as a translator at the Kyoto City International Relations Office. He obtained a PhD in literary translation studies at Victoria University of Wellington in 2012. The title of his thesis was Dances with Words: Issues in the Translation of Japanese Literature into English. His other areas of interest include Japanese media subculture and environmental technology.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Spotlight Presentation (2017) | “It is Happening Again”: Re-imagining in Mark Frost’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks
Jaimey Hamilton Faris
University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA

Biography

Jaimey Hamilton Faris is based in Honolulu, where she is Associate Professor of Art History and Critical Theory at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. At UHM, she directed Intersections, the Visiting Artist and Scholar Program, from 2008 to 2014, a residency that brings in globally recognised artists to share their artistic processes with the community. She is currently working on establishing a digital archive for oral histories of Hawaii’s artists. Since 2008 she has been interviewing Hawaii’s artists and is now working with her students to record conversations and studio practices of the islands’ artists. The histories reflect the uniqueness of artistic processes on the islands and relate how Hawaii’s history as a colony, plantation, military outpost and tourist paradise has impacted its visual culture.

Her academic writing focuses on issues of global trade networks and systems, environmentalism, and sustainability in contemporary art, especially in the Asia-Pacific context. Her book, Uncommon Goods (Intellect, 2013), explores the use of everyday goods and situations in contemporary art practice in response to neoliberal trade expansion in the nineties. In 2015 she guest edited a special volume of Art Margins on Capitalist Realism. She has published other articles on contemporary art in October, Art Journal, InVisible Culture, Art Pulse and more. Her current focus is on a collection of essays called Liquid Archives.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Keynote Presentation (2017) | Liquid Archives
Donna McIntire-Byrd
United States Department of State, USA

Biography

Donna McIntire-Byrd serves as Chief of the Energy & Sustainable Design Unit for the US Department of State Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations. She leads a team of multidisciplinary professionals within the department who are responsible for greening US embassies and consulates around the world and compiling a greenhouse gas inventory for the department’s approximately 20,000 building portfolio. Donna’s team produced the Guide to Green Embassies: Eco-Diplomacy in Operation, which has proven to be an invaluable tool for US embassies and consulates to improve performance and build a stronger environmental platform for the Department. In her recent role as Buildings & Climate Change Officer for the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), Donna facilitated the launch of the Common Carbon Metric for measuring energy efficiency and reporting greenhouse gas emissions from building operations as a global tool to establish.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Eco-Diplomacy – Water Conservation/Protection at US Embassies Demonstrating Best Practices for a Sustainable Built Environment
James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Nathaniel Newlands
Distinguished Researcher and Innovator from Canada

Biography

Dr Nathaniel Kenneth Newlands is an associate professor in geography with the University of Victoria (UVic), and an award winning research scientist and innovator. Nathaniel is a member of the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), American Statistical Association (ASA) and The International Environmetrics Society (TIES). He is an editor (Associate and Review) for the Frontiers Environmental Science (Interdisciplinary Climate Change) Journal. He is the author of Future Sustainable Ecosystems (Taylor & Francis), and has authored 68 original peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters, conference proceedings and numerous governmental and non-governmental technical reports. He is a strong lateral learner and systems thinker. His research addresses public-good food-water-energy nexus issues and tackles broad, integrated, complex global problems (e.g., climate change) to help support and advance global sustainable development.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Statistics in the Cognitive/Risk Era: Bridging Knowledge, Solutions and Pathways to a Sustainable World
William G. Staples
University of Kansas, USA

Biography

William G. Staples is the 2016-17 Paul and Helen Roofe Professor of Sociology, Chair of the Department of Sociology, and Founding Director of the Surveillance Studies Research Center at the University of Kansas. He received his PhD from the University of Southern California and was a postdoctoral fellow at UCLA. Staples is well known internationally for his work in the areas of social control and surveillance. He is the author of five books and dozens of articles and chapters. His most recent work is the second edition of Everyday Surveillance: Vigilance and Visibility in Postmodern Life, considered a foundational work in the interdisciplinary field of surveillance studies. Staples is a former Co-Editor of Sociological Inquiry, The Sociological Quarterly, and is currently Associate Editor of Surveillance & Society, the international journal of the Surveillance Studies Network.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Statistics in the Cognitive/Risk Era: Bridging Knowledge, Solutions and Pathways to a Sustainable World
Steve Cornwell
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Steve Cornwell is the President of IAFOR, and President of the Academic Governing Board. He coordinates and oversees the International Academic Advisory Board, and also serves on the organization's Board of Directors.

Dr Cornwell is Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies at Osaka Jogakuin University, and also teaches in the online portion of the MA TESOL Programme for the New School in New York. He helped write and design several of the New School courses and has been involved with the programme since its inception.

He has also been involved with the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) serving on its National Board of Directors as Director of Programme from 2012-2016; where his duties involved working with a volunteer team of 50+ to put on JALT’s annual, international conference each autumn.

Most recently, since 2012, he has been the Committee Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s Lifelong Learning Committee and is responsible for their evening extension Programme geared towards alumni and community members. He is also the Vice-Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s English Education Committee which is responsible for suggesting policy regarding English Education and also responsible for developing material for the integrated curriculum.

Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and a Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within the university.

He is also a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

A black belt in judo, he is married with two children, and lives in Japan.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Educational Policy: Does the Democratisation of Education in Educational Systems Fuel Economic and Social Inequality?
Curtis Ho
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Curtis Ho is Professor, Department Chair and Graduate Chair of the Learning Design and Technology department at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He has been a UH faculty member for over 30 years, teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in educational media research, interactive multimedia, web-based instruction, distance education, video technology, and computer-based education. He has taught courses in American and Western Samoa and Saipan, and was the first to offer a course statewide over the Hawai’i Interactive Television System.

Curtis Ho received his PhD in Educational Technology from Arizona State University where he served as instructional designer. He has consulted for public and private schools, financial institutions, and higher education. For several years he directed the Office of Faculty Development and Academic Support for the University of Hawaii’s Manoa campus. He has presented extensively at national and international conferences at locations including Beijing, Copenhagen, Eskisehir, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Lugano, Rome, Kumamoto, Kyoto, Melbourne, Montreal, Osaka, Panang, Taipei, Takamatsu, Tokyo, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Professor Ho was a Principal Investigator, Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director for three US Department of Education grants totalling over 9.8 million US dollars. He is a co-organiser of TCC Worldwide Online Conference, an executive committee member of E-Learn, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education, and is also past-President of the Pan Pacific Distance Learning Association, a chapter of the United States Distance Learning Association and of the Pacific Association for Communications and Technology, a chapter of the national Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

Sue Jackson
Birkbeck, University of London, UK

Biography

Sue Jackson is Professor Emeritus at Birkbeck, University of London. She was previously Pro-Vice-Master (Vice President) for Learning and Teaching, Professor of Lifelong Learning and Gender and Director of Birkbeck Institute for Lifelong Learning at Birkbeck. She publishes widely in the field of gender and lifelong learning, with a particular focus on identities.

Sue's recent publications include Innovations in Lifelong Learning: Critical Perspectives on Diversity, Participation and Vocational Learning (Routledge, 2011); Gendered Choices: Learning, Work, Identities in Lifelong Learning (Springer, 2011, with Irene Malcolm and Kate Thomas); and Lifelong Learning and Social Justice (NIACE, 2011).

Barbara Lockee
Virginia Tech, USA

Biography

Dr Lockee is Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at Virginia Tech, USA, where she is also Associate Director of the School of Education and Associate Director of Educational Research and Outreach. She teaches courses in instructional design, message design, and distance education. Her research interests focus on instructional design issues related to technology-mediated learning. She has published more than 80 papers in academic journals, conferences and books, and has presented her scholarly work at over 90 national and international conferences.

Dr Lockee is Immediate Past President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, an international professional organisation for educational technology researchers and practitioners. She earned her PhD in 1996 from Virginia Tech in Curriculum and Instruction (Instructional Technology), M.A. in 1991 from Appalachian State University in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Media), and BA in 1986 from Appalachian State University in Communication Arts.

James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.


Previous IICSEEHawaii Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Ted O’Neill
Gakushuin University, Japan

Biography

Ted O’Neill is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo, in the Faculty of International Social Sciences. He previously taught at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and J. F. Oberlin University. Ted was co-editor of The Language Teacher for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) and later served on the JALT National Board of Directors as Director of Public Relations from 2012 to 2016. He received an MA in ESL and Bilingual Education from the University of Massachusetts/Boston, USA in 1996 and completed a postgraduate Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Literacy through the Graduate School of Education at the State University of New York in 2014. He is a part of a research group studying implementation of content-based language education and content and language integrated learning in East and Southeast Asia with the generous support of The Research Institute for Oriental Cul­tures at Gakushuin University.​

Professor Ted O’Neill is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Educational Technology section of the International Academic Advisory Board.